A Travellerspoint blog

466 / 64

Cape Town, South Africa

sunny 71 °F

This trip was originally planned for a long 4-day, 2-holiday weekend during the first week of September, but riots over bread prices and subsequent security issues stimulated the U.S. government to confine me and the rest of its employees to the city limits. I was initially saddened by the prospect of not getting to see Cape Town while in the region, but then I remembered what my glassblowing teacher, and surrogate mother, had once taught me. Whenever I was working on a piece that seemed hopeless because of incurred mistakes, she would exclaim, "We fix!" - and after 5 minutes of her magic and dexterity, we would be back on track. I applied this maxim to my travel plans, and after talking to individuals for 4 different bookings, I only incurred one change fee of $57. We fix!

That was only the first of a series of unexpected events. When I landed in Cape Town, I tried to withdraw money from an ATM without success. I called my bank, and they verified what I thought was going on - my debit card had expired. I explained my situation, and after 3 different representatives, the message finally registered that there was no way to solve my predicament. I tried to call my credit card company to see if I could use it at the ATMs. They told me that I just needed my pin that I used to set up the card. Since I had never used a pin with a credit card, I had no idea what it was.

"We can send you the information in the mail," the representative said.

"I'm in Cape Town," I logically reasoned.

"Well, we can send it to your address in the U.S., it will be there in 10 days, and then someone can call you with the information."

"I'll be home in 10 days."

The conversation was clearly not going my way. After two banks the next day, and one very melodramatic phone call to the credit card company, I got those magic words, "okay, give me 4 numbers that you want as your new PIN." Hallelujah! I thanked the individual for being my guardian angel, promised him my first born child, and presto, I had 1500 Rand in hand.

After I realized I wasn't making significant headway on the aforementioned issue the first day, I immediately dropped my stuff at the hostel and scouted out the waterfront. I walked quite a bit before darkness hit, and played tourist taking pictures of all objects unique. When my legs couldn't take it anymore, I went to an amazing deli down the street from the hostel that had been recommended by my friend, Taryn. I talked with a group of South Africans until about 12 AM, and then I promptly passed out.

Giovanni's

Giovanni's


So would this be a cloudfall?

So would this be a cloudfall?


Welcome to Cape Town

Welcome to Cape Town


Taking a rest

Taking a rest


The lighthouse

The lighthouse


Green Point Stadium - one of the venues for the 2010 World Cup

Green Point Stadium - one of the venues for the 2010 World Cup

My first full day in South Africa was spent just outside the town of Kleinbaai, a town about 2 hours South of Cape Town. This township is famous for its proximity to Dyer island, an area known to have the highest concentration of Great White sharks in the world. On the drive over, I met a few cool people including an Australian businessman, a couple from Saudi Arabia, and a scientist from England named Kayleigh. Kayleigh and I discovered we had a common penchant for crude jokes and extreme sports and hit it off famously.

The boat ride out to the spot was relatively short. Apparently, the Great Whites congregate more towards the shore in the summertime and hang around the island during the seal pupping season in the Winter. The captain found a good spot, we anchored, and we were given a safety brief on how to enter the shark cage and precautions on how to not get eaten. They commented that there was a possibility that we may not see any sharks, and everyone started to frown like children who had been brought to Disneyland only to find out that all the fun rides were broken. Luckily, on that day, their disclaimer didn't apply.

Within 15 minutes after the safety brief, Great Whites had been spotted in the water. Kayleigh and I were in the first group, and we were told to put on our wetsuits, boots and weights. 5 of us slid into the cage and watched as the sharks calculatingly swam by to observe us and reap any food rewards that awaited in the periphery. The water visibility was amazing, and I was momentarily upset that I had forgotten my underwater housing in the states. Nevertheless, I was struck with fascination while observing these beautiful, ancient creatures.

After 20 minutes, we were told to switch out with the next group. I was allowed to go back in since there were only 3 in the next set, and I occupied the outside left corner for the second dive. The viewing initially seemed less eventful as it appeared the sharks' interest had waned. At one point, myself and the guy next to me were watching a shark slowly swim by when the shark suddenly jerked to the left and opened its jaws. I watched in fear as the shark propelled itself directly towards me, and I threw up my hands just before the jaws reached the cage. The shark latched onto the cage literally 6 inches in front of my body. I was terrified at first, but I quickly remembered the barrier and just watched the shark in amazement. It stared at me intently for 10 seconds, its left eye fixated on my terrified exterior. I looked back with an odd mixture of respect, fear and curiosity.

After the shark had been affixed to the cage for about 5 seconds, I saw a finger come out from my right peripheral vision moving towards the shark. I looked incredulously over at my cage mate in order to silently question this bold move. He wanted to touch the shark. Then we heard voices from above yell, "do not touch the shark! We will take you out of the water!" I thanked them silently for their verbal reasoning, and the guy next to me backed off. I was a bit shaken up when I got out of the cage, but double counted all my appendages and decided I was fine. Once we got back on shore, the adrenaline quickly wore off and fatigue set in. The van dropped me at my point of origin, and as I was walking back to my hostel, and I saw a sign that I felt was fitting considering the days events (see below).

Put it in the water!

Put it in the water!


I don't know what pose I was going for here, Mic Jagger?

I don't know what pose I was going for here, Mic Jagger?


Open the shark cage door, Hal

Open the shark cage door, Hal


The Great White

The Great White


Chasing the chum

Chasing the chum


She's a big one

She's a big one


A pun to appreciate

A pun to appreciate

Sunday was an equally active day. I walked to the Nelson Mandela Pier and took the short ferry to Robben island. I was met by a tour guide which took us around the island by bus and explained the history of the prison. It started as a penal colony in 1631 and was used by various occupying powers until South Africa built a maximum security prison in the 1960s to house its political dissidents. It would house major members of the Pan African Congress and African National Congress, including Nelson Mandela.

Prisoners at the institution were not referred to by their names but instead by their prisoner number. The code consisted of two numbers separated by a slash. The first number represented the chronological number of the person sentenced for that particular calendar year, and the last two digits indicated the year of the sentencing. Nelson Mandela was the 466th person sentenced in 1964, he was known as 466 / 64.

I was unprepared for how seeing Mandela's cell would affect me. I will never truly know what the man went through, but seeing his cell made me begin to realize how amazing of a person he was for preaching reconciliation upon his release after 27 years of incarceration. The guide who gave us the tour was an ex-prisoner and had an amazing story himself. After observing his pregnant girlfriend innocently shot by police during a peaceful demonstration, he joined the militant arm of the ANC. He trained with resistance fighters in Angola and East Germany, and upon return, his first mission was to use a bazooka to blow up a government petrol truck. His team miscalculated the shot, and they were discovered, tried and convicted for high treason. He spent 11 years on the island and was among the last of the political prisoners to be released in 1991.

He also described the harsh punishments that the prisoners would sometimes have to endure. The most vile among them was when the guard instructed them to dig a hole, only to remain in the hole and subsequently be filled up to their neck in sand. After some time, the guards would return to urinate on the head of the trapped prisoner. I came away with a new respect for those who think for themselves, question the established order and refuse to be the victims of oppressive and unjust tyranny.

I think we can all learn something from this

I think we can all learn something from this


Welcome to....prison?

Welcome to....prison?


On Robben Island

On Robben Island


Benjamin lecturing on his experiences

Benjamin lecturing on his experiences


Cell 4

Cell 4


Prisoner 466 / 64

Prisoner 466 / 64


Confined

Confined


The lime quarry where Mandela and his fellow political prisoners were subjected to hard labor

The lime quarry where Mandela and his fellow political prisoners were subjected to hard labor


Mural for Mandiba

Mural for Mandiba

After a long walk back to the hostel and a lot of reflection, I took a cab to the trail head of Table Mountain. This iconic feature defines the skyline of Cape Town as it encloses the city with the breaks of the Atlantic. I was told the hike would take about 2 hours to the top, but I of course resolved to complete it faster than the average time - see "Y chromosome." The trail was straight up and was definitely not what I would classify as an easy trail. It seemed to progress endlessly, and I would periodically rest under the guise of observing the view up to that point in the trail as more intrepid individuals passed.

Up

Up


And up

And up


And up some more

And up some more


Cut from shadows

Cut from shadows

After 72 minutes and a waning water supply, I reached the top of the mesa and marveled at the panorama. I was unexpectedly even more fascinated by the different types of flowers that graced the top slopes. I looked more like a botanist with my camera than a tourist, but there were so many unique species that I couldn't stop taking pictures. Since I was unable to find the names of the flowers via the internet, I decided to name them myself based on their characteristics (actual names also welcome).

Eccentric

Eccentric


Elegant

Elegant


Open

Open


Guarded

Guarded


Multi-faceted

Multi-faceted

I took in the sites for about an hour and decided that I preferred not to punish my knees and take the cable car down. The car to the base took about 5 minutes, and I suddenly felt quite slothful about the time I had been previously proud of. I returned to the hostel, had a burger and chronicled my exploits to my fellow travelers. I went to bed with only the regret that I didn't have more time there - if you find yourself in this part of the world, Cape Town is a must!

The Cape

The Cape


Lion's Head with Robben Island in the distance

Lion's Head with Robben Island in the distance


Twelve Apostles

Twelve Apostles


The easy way down

The easy way down

Posted by mbeymer 14:47 Archived in South Africa

Culture in Controversy

Ezulwini, Swaziland

Due to the technicalities of a business visa, i.e. I need to leave the country every 30 days, and in the interest of culture, I decided to head back to Swaziland for the weekend to observe the annual Umphalaga festival. This week long event is one of two national celebrations held each year and typically takes place at the end of August. Virgin maidens come from all around the kingdom to present reeds to the queen mother in hopes of being selected as a new wife to the king. The past 3 years the king has not selected a wife (he already has 13), but it still acts as a forum for Swazis to celebrate their culture and traditions. Since foreigners are only allowed to visit on Sunday and Monday, I planned a couple more activities with my roommate to fill out the weekend.

Swaziland is also famous for the beautiful candles that it produces, and we decided that the factory would be a good first stop on our journey. I talked at length with one of the artists, and he said that one candle typically takes the sculptor about ten minutes to create. They press patterned plates into the wax to create the unique decoration on the candles and shape the figure with their hands into various animals. We admired the art, played with some of it, and bought a few trinkets. We also had lunch at an amazing restaurant annexed to the factory. I wouldn't have thought that a chocolate chili brownie would have been good, but I was fighting my roommate for the last piece of it.

Vibrant tableware

Vibrant tableware


Parking fail

Parking fail


I don't care if it's not a hat

I don't care if it's not a hat


Swazi candle

Swazi candle

We then drove the car to the camp we were staying in and checked into our beehive hut. I'll rewrite that just so that you know it's not a typo - we stayed in a beehive hut. I'll admit that I was skeptical when my roommate booked the accomodation, but it was pretty cool. It was essentially a structure made entirely out of reeds and sticks, interwoven together into a massive dome. Despite the look, the inside was rather nice in that it had a cement floor and a modern bathroom connected. We then intrepidly drove our Kia Picanto, nicknamed the week before as the brave little toaster, around the dirt roads of the park to explore. Despite a few wrong turns and almost getting stuck, it was a fun little jaunt.

Quite possibly the weirdest thing I've slept in

Quite possibly the weirdest thing I've slept in


Hanging out in the beehive

Hanging out in the beehive

We woke up in the small hours the next day to go on a horseback ride through the game reserve. On safari, the most animal sightings are typically seen in the early morning and early evening as the animals like to sleep during the hot hours of the day. Our early rise allowed us to see a lot of cool animals, and rather up close, including yellow warblers, zebra, and blesbok. We also got a good view of execution rock, where the custom was to throw people off of the top of the rock if they had been found guilty of murder. They don't practice this form of justice anymore, but I could imagine that it was probably an effective deterrent as I glanced up at this impressive geological wonder. After the guide decided that we were rather good at following directions, he decided to let us trot the horses at the end. It was a bit hard at first but fun once I got the hang of it. As those of you who have seen me dance know, I am rhythmically challenged so I naturally thought that my mastery of the trot cadence was a great success.

The Bad (The Good and The Ugly not pictured)

The Bad (The Good and The Ugly not pictured)


Blesbok in the early morning

Blesbok in the early morning


Someone took a lot of time painting this horse...

Someone took a lot of time painting this horse...


Execution Rock as seen from horseback

Execution Rock as seen from horseback

It was the plan to have our guide met us to take us to the reed dance shortly after the horse ride, but upon arriving, he looked confused and informed us that it wouldn't start for another 4 hours. I chalked this piece of miscommunication between myself and the tour company as another point for the tourism in the developing world and decided that we would set out North to see some ancient bushman rock displays. The drive was absolutely beautiful as we weaved through Northern Swaziland. The rock paintings were also very cool with a scenic hike that overlooked the Komati River.

Maguga Dam

Maguga Dam


Flowers in winter

Flowers in winter


The Komati River

The Komati River


Nsangwini rock paintings

Nsangwini rock paintings

The last stop on the trip was the reed dance held in the Ezulwini valley of the Western part of the kingdom. The festival has been met with controversy in the last few years since Swaziland has an HIV prevalence of over 26%, one of the highest in the world, and the event is looked at as promoting patriarchal values that potentially lead to the further spread of HIV. I was familiar with this sentiment before going, but I wanted to hear from the perspectives of Swazis and observe the tradition for myself.

We watched regiments of these bachelorettes march by, singing and dancing with their reeds. After presenting their tribute to the queen mother, they descended upon the stadium to dance for the king and his dignitaries. Although the costumes were beautiful, it was rather tedious to watch group after group march into the stadium. There are typically over 10,000 maidens at this event, and after 2 hours of watching the parade, we decided that it was probably best to get back to the border to cross before it closed. We digitally captured the pomp and circumstance and then decided to take our leave.

The procession

The procession


Reeds in hand

Reeds in hand


An interesting fusion of the traditional and the new

An interesting fusion of the traditional and the new


Mass of maidens

Mass of maidens


Acting foolish

Acting foolish

Posted by mbeymer 12:42 Archived in Swaziland

Fame

Quelimane, Mozambique

Right after I got back to Maputo, I got up early the next day and set off with my boss to Quelimane in Central Mozambique. The plan was to spend four days observing various projects run by John's Hopkins that were currently receiving funding from USAID and hold focus groups to monitor their progress. We arrived in Zambezia province and were picked up by a 4WD truck to take us to our hotel. The driver warned me that there was a lot of potholes and to watch my head. Since I commute down Wilshire boulevard weekly in Los Angeles, I am all too familiar with the concept of potholes and snobbishly remarked that it couldn't be worse than Los Angeles. It was. Let's just say that I now know how a bobble head feels. I heard a rumor as to why the roads were in such a state of disrepair. This populace of this town frequently votes for the main opposition party, and the word on the street (or what's left of it) is that the party in power was "punishing" them for this lack of allegiance by not fixing the roads. That doesn't exactly sound like a way to win the hearts and minds.

After a very bumpy 20 minutes, we arrived at the Hotel Chaubo which was like being transported back in time to the 1960s. Before the civil war, it had been one of the nicest hotels in Mozambique. The province suffered the brunt of the war, and although the hotel itself was not harmed, tourists understandably stopped coming to the area. For this reason, I was told, nothing had been updated in over 40 years aside for one thing - they replaced the orange shag carpet with a more contemporary blue rug. So it goes.

As we rode up to our floor in the equally ancient elevator, my boss pointed to a plack that adorned the upper part of the wall - "Ascensores Schindler" (or "Schindler Elevators"). My boss remarked that these elevators had been made by Oskar Schindler, a man immortalized in the classic film, "Schindler's List." This man was a member of the Nazi party during World War II, and brokered a deal with the Germans to take Jews from internment camps to work in his factories. This exploitation was short-lived, and he developed humanity in the process. He shifted his thinking radically from business exploitation to doing everything he could to protect these Jews from Hitler's gas chambers, sometimes at great personal cost. They would later honor his sacrifices by calling themselves "Schindler" Jews.

Why have just a red window when you can also have blue?

Why have just a red window when you can also have blue?


Retro

Retro

The Hotel Chaubo

The Hotel Chaubo

Apparently they also use this shower to clean elephants

Apparently they also use this shower to clean elephants


Oskar's legacy

Oskar's legacy

The day after we arrived, we were taken to a school on the periphery of town to present certificates to professors who had completed a course designed to teach youth about HIV. As we exited the car, about a thousand children stopped dead in their tracks to observe us get out of the truck. A swarm of primary school students amassed and many smiled and jumped to grab our attention. I was unprepared for this welcoming reception, and to recover, I waved and smiled at as many as I could.

We sat in the school house as each teacher was presented with their certificate of completion by the staff. All the while, children would peer into the classroom through the cinder block windows and periodically be shunned away by an alert professor. When we emerged an hour later, it seemed as though the crowd had doubled in size. I took out my camera to capture the scene of the contingent, and this sent our admirers into hysteria. I took pictures of the groups of the children who had made it to the front of the frenzy, lowered my camera to show them, and they would giggle as they observed their digital doppelgangers.

Professors receiving their certificates of completion

Professors receiving their certificates of completion


Ready for their photo opp.

Ready for their photo opp.


Fame

Fame

I amassed such a following that I was eventually pinned to the wall and decided that I would shoot a video of my new found friends. I yelled "Boa Tarde!," now becoming a favorite expression of mine, and tried to have them follow suit but was unsuccessful on the first attempt. The second try was met with a few replies in kind, and the third was executed in perfect unison as if it had been rehearsed a thousand times.

I shook hands with as many as I could, and then my colleagues and I retreated to the vehicle. I waved as we exited, and a few enterprising youth chased our vehicle for as long as their legs could take them as we traveled back to our point of origin. I may never actually be famous, but at least I had my 15 minutes.

To a job well done

To a job well done

Posted by mbeymer 10:05 Archived in Mozambique

Serenity and Solitude

Chidenguele, Mozambique

As many of you no doubt guessed, my first experience driving on the left side of the road was not all that I had hoped for. Since I believe in getting back on the horse, or the left side of the road in this case, I decided to rent a car and head up the Northern Mozambican coast to the small town of Chidenguele. My roommate, Susanna, and I each had a bit of trepidation about my driving skills, but we set some ground rules, and everything went smoothly at first. Since the resort we were going to was a bit isolated, we had to drive the last 7 kilometers off road which the website said was "suitable for all cars."

Just stay on the left

Just stay on the left

The website apparently didn't know that you could put four wheels on a toaster and call it a car because that's essentially what we were driving. As we turned off road, we felt ourselves start to get stuck time after time and then I would rev the engine as the locals watched amused, come out of the ditch, and wave while exclaiming "Boa tarde!" to the onlookers. Susanna decided to make fun of me for the rest of the trip about this whenever I would get stuck doing something - a joke that never seemed to get old to either of us. We made it all the way to the last hill and then finally got stuck in the sand for good. I tried to use a cereal box under the wheel to give it some traction, and that was bad idea if you hadn't already guessed. Susanna finally decided to walk down the hill and get some help for us, and with 3 very patient members of the hotel staff, we were able to complete the last 200 meters of the journey.

The hotel we stayed at was amazing. We had essentially a house on a cliff with a porch that overlooked the ocean. We dropped our stuff and walked on a beach where one could see about 5 miles on all sides of the cliffs, and there wasn't a soul to be found. We hiked until the sun decided that it had had enough for the day, and adjourned to our separate rooms for the evening.

I was having trouble sleeping that night, so I decided to get up early and watch the sunrise. I hadn't planned on running, but the sunrise was so beautiful that I decided to run barefoot along the waves for as long as I could and enjoy it. As was the case the day before, there was absolutely no one to be seen. I have seen many a sunrise in my life, and I can honestly say that it was the most beautiful one I have ever seen. With the perfection of the moment, the lack of anyone around and my fatigued state, I thought for a second that I might be dead and I had somehow arrived in Valhalla. Then I thought about it a little more, weighed my chances of going somewhere good in death, and reasoned that it was probably just a really nice day.

A piece of peace

A piece of peace

A little awe

A little awe


And a lot of humility

And a lot of humility


Alone

Alone


Mr. Miyagi not pictured

Mr. Miyagi not pictured

Susanna got up a bit later and we decided to walk South for as far as our legs could take us. We stopped periodically to examine the treasure trove of shells that washed up on the beach and took a few suitable souvenirs. We tried to walk up to a lighthouse but a few directional disagreements only got us a view of it. We read for the rest of the day and watched the humpback whales swim by from the porch. I had some really good prawns for dinner and was actually starting to relax. This whole concept of relaxation has not classically been part of my personality, but I'm starting to see the appeal.

Show me your surfer pose

Show me your surfer pose


Let me hear your war cry

Let me hear your war cry


Lighthouse overlooking the cliffs of Chidenguele

Lighthouse overlooking the cliffs of Chidenguele


Humpback whale in the yonder

Humpback whale in the yonder

I don't like it when my food looks at me

I don't like it when my food looks at me

The next day we swam a bit, and I got to feel like a kid again. I body surfed until it felt like I couldn't lift my arms, and we headed back down South to Maputo. Susanna drove this time, and we definitely had an easier time getting through the sand. The only event of import was a speed trap that we were caught in just outside Maputo. All I can say is that diplomatic passports are a thing of beauty...

Posted by mbeymer 09:58 Archived in Mozambique

Marooned

Inhaca Island, Mozambique

Inhaca is an island of 6,000 about 2 hours ferry ride from Mozambique. It is very small, measuring only 7.5 miles in length and 4 miles across. My journey to the island was pleasant, aside from the sporadic turbulence, and I struck up a conversation with a nice French expat currently living in the United States. He said that he was taking a tour of the lighthouse on the Northeastern tip of the island and asked if I would like to tag alone.

The chariot awaits

The chariot awaits

What do you mean I can't name it?

What do you mean I can't name it?

As the open truck surged through the countryside passing under palms and papaya trees, with tecno music blaring to alert unaware pedestrians, I glanced over at my new companion to convey my confirmation that we were finally off the beaten path. There are no paved roads, no ATMs, and the downtown, if one can call it that, is only distinguished from other parts of the island in that the buildings were minutely closer together.

We made it to the lighthouse and dismounted to follow our guides up a steep sand dune. The vista that awaited reminded me of the views that my best friend Ed and I often enjoyed during our long strolls within San Diego's Torrey Pines preserve. This beach was notably different in that the rock formations near the wave break resembled waves themselves. It is almost as if the rocks, tired of the tormenting tides, decided to form an equal and opposing force to counter the ocean's onslaught.

Just like home

Just like home


Lunar pools

Lunar pools

Every action has an equal and opposite reaction

Every action has an equal and opposite reaction


To give them some scale

To give them some scale


A shipwreck off the coast

A shipwreck off the coast


A crab preparing to take cover

A crab preparing to take cover

As we drove back to the Western shores, children would chase after the truck in an effort to become temporary stowaways. Some were even successful and then, realizing that there homes were disappearing in the distance, would jump off into the sandy road and laugh as friends chased after them and congratulated their successful conquest. Every single person we passed smiled and waved at us, some for prolonged periods of time. I brought this trend up to the guide and declared that everyone seemed really nice on the island.

He chuckled softly and said, "No, they are just excited to see white people."

Realizing that my guide had the better hypothesis in mind, I laughed and conceded to this honest observation.

Speedy Stowaways

Speedy Stowaways

The camp that I stayed at is operated by a nice Afrikaner family that offered me a plate of delicious mussels shortly after I arrived. I followed that up with a half of a chicken and then set off on another walk to explore the west coast of the island. To orient myself, I used the arrow that I usually use to find my bearing. The only problem was that the compass seemed backwards.

Based on my map and geographical features, I knew that I was pointed South. But the arrow that I was using said that I was pointed North. I ignored the compass and obstinately set off. Five minutes later, I finally realized that the compass wasn't necessarily wrong. I was on the other sides of the planet and, in the Southern Hemisphere, the poles actually flip. I chuckled to myself, thanked my physics professor silently and continued on down the beach.

I walked until the waves and the rocks were my only companions, about 2 hours due South (or was it North?) from my starting point. I decided that I needed to turn back to beat the darkness and was treated with a show of slow solar retreat, progressing through all shades of crimson until the last sliver dipped under the horizon.

The morning star appeared first into the then purple sky with others slowly making their debut as darkness dawned.

Cupped in the hands of clouds

Cupped in the hands of clouds

As daylight dies

As daylight dies


For all you know, this could be a picture of LA

For all you know, this could be a picture of LA

I arrived back at the camp, just after darkness had completely fallen, and the proprietor incredulously asked, "where have you been?"

"On a walk," I modestly replied.

"For four hours?" He pressed on.

"It was a long walk," I continued.

He, along with everyone else and the bar, looked at me crazy for a second, and I truthfully believed them for a short time since I had pretty much traversed the Western side of the island. As if reading my mind, he said, "well do you want something to drink then?"

I smiled on and nodded and joined them in watching the local rugby match on the television. As I sat there at the bar, me with a coke and a group of Afrikaner men silently gazing at the television beers in hand, I thought to myself, Saturday night really is the same around the world.

The wind kicked up that night and didn't quit until late the next morning. I realized as soon as I awoke that my hopes to go snorkeling were in vain. The white caps marched across the sea and kicked up silt everywhere. I cut my losses and went for another walk before the boat departed.

Since the boat came at low tide, we had to wade out to the boat in order to get back to our point or origin. The boat ride was great on the way back, and with how the light rays reflected off of the water's surface, I was able to take a few photos of downtown Maputo whose impressions seemed to be a harbinger of the apocalypse. I hope that I'm wrong on that one.

The light making a cool silhouette of downtown Maputo

The light making a cool silhouette of downtown Maputo

Posted by mbeymer 12:29 Archived in Mozambique

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